WCVI - Florida Opinion Poll

Florida Opinion Poll

Quick Facts


Cuban Americans feel that improving their quality of life in South Florida is a higher priority than changing the government in Cuba.
Sixty-two percent of those surveyed feel that it is more important to spend time and money improving life in South Florida. Only 19 percent say it is more important to work to change the government of Cuba. This opinion is stronger among younger Cuban Americans. For example, 72 percent of those under age 45 feel that improving the quality of life in South Florida is more important than working to change the Cuban government.

A strong majority of Cuban Americans wish politicians would focus more on local rather than international issues.
Sixty-five percent feel that politicians should focus more on issues within the local community. Only 12 percent feel that politicians should focus more on international issues. Seventy-seven percent of males under age 45; and, 72 percent of females under the same age say local issues are more important than international ones.

Less than a majority of Cuban Americans in Miami-Dade support the use of force by the United States to overthrow Fidel Castro. Further, a strong majority agrees that the residents of Cuba should decide when and how the political system in Cuba should be changed.
Forty-nine percent agree the U.S. should use force to overthrow Castro. Sixtyeight percent agree the residents of Cuba should decide how and when the political system there should change. The percentage was higher among younger respondents: 72 percent of males under 45; and, 71 percent of younger females.

When given the choice between two hypothetical candidates, a majority would support the candidate who advocates current U.S. policy towards Cuba.
Fifty-eight percent would support the candidate in favor of current U.S. policy towards Cuba, while 34 percent would support the candidate who would work to reform U.S. policy towards Cuba by allowing more trade, travel and investment in Cuba.

When given the choice between three hypothetical candidates, Cuban Americans are more likely to back a candidate who will continue the embargo. However, there are drastic age differences.
Forty-nine percent of all those surveyed would vote for a candidate who would take a hard-line approach toward Cuba, and continue the embargo. However, there are striking differences by age: Only 34 percent of Cubans under age 45 prefer the hard-line candidate, while 62 percent of Cubans over age 65 prefer such a candidate.

Younger Cuban Americans feel that the values of Cubans are different than the values of non-Cubans.
Fifty-two percent feel the values and priorities of Cubans are different from the values and priorities of non-Cubans. Thirty-five percent feel they are the same. However, younger Cuban Americans are more likely to say the values and priorities of non-Cubans are different. Fifty-eight percent of under-45 males felt that way; 60 percent of middle-aged males ( 45-to 64 years old ) did, too; and, 59 percent of under-45 females feel the same way.

A strong minority of those surveyed believe that the U.S. and Cuban governments should take steps to allow retirement in Cuba.
Forty-one percent (41%) of those surveyed agree that the U.S. and Cuba should allow a person to retire in Cuba if they wish too. Forty-five percent of males under age 45 agree with this position and fifty-three percent of females under age 45 agree with the position

Cuban Americans feel that they are lied to by politicians who use Cuban issues for political gain.
Seventy percent of those surveyed believe that politicians mislead people about their stand on Cuba just to get votes.

Cuban Americans believe that the Bush administration should get involved in the Cardoso case to help reunite the family in Miami.
Sixty-five percent feel that the Bush administration should do more to get the parents of two children living with an uncle in Miami-Dade out Cuba where they are being retained on anti-Castro charges. ( Eds. note: The Cardoso question was added to the survey after interviewing started. Thus, the question was put to just
337 respondents. The margin of error for the question is 5 percent, which wouldn’t affect the conclusion.)